Brain Criticality: The Past, the Present and the Future

Organizers

Dante Chialvo  | Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Argentina
Claudius Gros | Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany

Abstract

The animals’ adaptive behavior depends on their brain’s ability to sustain a large repertoire of spatio-temporal activity patterns. A fundamental problem in neuroscience is to understand the mechanisms by which brains can produce in a robust and flexible manner a huge range of neuronal dynamical configurations. A plausible solution, coming from statistical physics, invokes the emergence of complex phenomena exhibited universally by dynamical systems poised near a critical point of a second-order phase transition. In the last decade, work on this so called “brain criticality hypothesis” attracted attention across disciplines.

The aim of the workshop is to provide a discussion forum for the perspective of the field: Where do we stand, which are open issues, and where to go from here. The emphasis will not be on technical presentation, but on a controversial assessment of the field. The workshop would be connected to the “Focus on Criticality and Complexity in Brain Dynamics”, edited by the workshop organizers.

Schedule (CEST)

14:00

Introduction

14:15

Dietmar Plenz | National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, USA
Neuronal avalanche scaling using all optical investigation in the awake mouse

14:50

Claudius Gros Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany
The stationary brain

15:25

Stefanie Miller | University of California San Francisco, USA
Long term stability of neuronal avalanches

16:00

15 min break

16:15

Anna Levina | University of Tübingen, Germany
Subsampled, self-organized and close to optimal

16:50

Joern Davidsen | University of Calgary, Canada
Is it enough to look like an avalanche?

17:25

Christian Meisel | Charité, Berlin, Germany
Is the brain critically slowing down?

18:00

Serena di Santo | Columbia University, New York, USA
The rise and fall of hubs in self-organized
critical learning networks

18:35

Miguel Munoz | University of Granada, Spain
Universal & non-universal scaling in brain activity and artificial neural networks

19:10

General discussion & round-up

19:50

End