Frequency-preference responses to external perturbations: from neurons to networks

Organizers

Rodrigo F.O. Pena | New Jersey Institute of Technology & Rutgers University, Newark, USA
Horacio G. Rotstein | New Jersey Institute of Technology & Rutgers University, Newark, USA

Abstract

Neuronal oscillations have been observed at many interacting levels of neuronal organization in the brain. Several structures process information in a frequency-dependent manner. Often frequency-dependent processing occurs not only at the circuit level, but also at the level of neurons and synapses, which posses frequency-filtering properties. Neuronal resonance generically refers to the ability of neuronal systems to exhibit an amplified response to oscillatory inputs at a preferred frequency band, and is often associated with preferred frequency phase responses. There is evidence that neuronal populations can maintain selective communication through oscillatory synchrony and that cognitive functions are flexibly chosen through such a mechanism.

The goal of this workshop is to gather theoreticians and experimentalists who work on these issues from different perspectives and focus on different levels of organization and the interactions between them. The topics will cover, but are not limited to subthreshold, spiking and network resonance, oscillatory synchrony, communication through coherence, entrainment, cognitive flexibility, cross level interactions.

Schedule (CEST)

14:00

Introduction

14:10

Pascal Fries | Ernst Strüngmann Institute, Frankfurt a.M., Germany
Communication through coherence

14:35

Arvind Kumar | KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
Selective and flexible routing of information across brain regions: mechanisms and their biological plausibility

15:00

Jorge Mejias | University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Frequency-dependent hierarchical interactions across cortical and subcortical networks

15:25

Discussion 1st panel: Communication

15:45

30 min break

16:15

Farzan Nadim | New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, USA
Frequency preference of gap-junction mediated electrical coupling and its potential function

16:40

Carmen Canavier | LSU Health New Orleans, USA
Theta-Nesta gamma in the entorhinal cortex

17:05

Rodrigo Pena | New Jersey Institute of Technology & Rutgers University, Newark, USA
Flexible selection of cognitive tasks and memory suppression in a hippocampus – prefrontal cortex model

17:30

Michelle McCarthy | Boston University, USA
Thalamocortical network remodeling during the critical period of development

17:55

Discussion 2nd panel: Resonance, oscillations, and interacting levels

18:15

30 min break

18:45

Eran Stark | Tel Aviv University, Israel
Network resonance in the cortex of freely moving animals

19:10

Horacio G. Rotstein | New Jersey Institute of Technology & Rutgers University, Newark, USA
Networks of E-I firing rate models and spiking (LIF) models show similar resonance patterns by different mechanisms

19:35

Warren M. Grill| Duke University, Durham, USA
Frequency-Dependent Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on Cells and Networks

20:00

Zeinab Esmaeilpour | CUNY City College, New York, USA
Unmodulated and Amplitude-Modulated Kilohertz Frequency Electric Filed Stimulation of Gamma Oscillation Network

20:25

John White| Boston University, USA
Behavioral effects of phase-dependent stimulation of engram cells

20:50

Discussion 3rd panel: brain stimulation

21:10

End